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geoengineering

Geoengineering - Insanity? All the More Reason to Discuss It

July 22, 2014 by Tom Schueneman
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Geoengineering and Hard Choices

Is geoengineering the key to solving the global climate change problem? That’s the kind of question that evokes a knee-jerk reaction from those who consider it, including me. I believe we’re already doing enough geoengineering on the planet, albeit unplanned and perhaps unintended.[read more]

2C in our Rear-View Mirror, Geoengineering Dead Ahead

April 25, 2014 by Lou Grinzo
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The idea that 2C of warming is a sufficient way to specify a guideline is naive. Just as important is the rate of change, as quick change will ripple through the environment and cause much more ecological disruption than would slow change resulting in the same absolute temperature level.[read more]

Can Geoengineering Save the Planet?

January 24, 2014 by Breakthrough Institute
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Geoengineering and the Planet

Geoengineering. It’s not the sexiest sounding topic, but a small group of scientists say it just might be able to save the world. The basic idea behind it is that humans can artificially moderate the Earth's climate allowing us to control temperature, thereby avoiding the negative impacts of climate change.[read more]

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Q&A Series: Geomagnetic Disturbances and Power Outages Part V

February 28, 2013 by Andrew Lawless

On January 15, 2013, I presented a webcast on Energy Central titled, “Geomagnetic Disturbances and their Impacts on Power Transformers”. You can view the presentation here. The presentation generated many questions from the audience that I did not have time to address. This blog post addresses a few of those questions. This is the fifth...[read more]

Q&A Series: Geomagnetic Disturbances & Power Outages Part II

February 11, 2013 by Andrew Lawless

Some people are claiming that a Geomagnetic Disturbances (GMD) event can result in large scale transformer failures. Is this true? Another excellent question and answer session with Andrew Lawless on geoengineering risks.[read more]

Q&A Series: Geomagnetic Disturbances & Power Outages

February 6, 2013 by Andrew Lawless
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On January 15, 2013, I presented a webcast titled, “Geomagnetic Disturbances and their Impacts on Power Transformers”. The presentation generated many questions from the audience that I did not have time to address. I especially want to respond to those questions pertaining to energy security, solar storms, geomagnetically induced currents, and energy risk.[read more]

On Geoengineering

July 19, 2012 by Breakthrough Institute
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Galyna Andrushko/Shutterstock

I recently had the great pleasure of attending this year's Breakthrough Dialogue at Cavallo Point, an event at which the Breakthrough Institute brought together kindred spirits of disparate views to hash out some of the many issues that that Institute takes an interest in. On the basis of this Economist special report I was invited to...[read more]

Suck It Up: A book about climate change, geoengineering and air capture of CO2

March 2, 2012 by Marc Gunther
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 Editor's note: Marc Gunther is a long-time advisory board member and contributor to TEC. Congratulations to Marc on the publication of his new book! I’m pleased to let you know that my book, Suck It Up: How capturing carbon from the air can help solve the climate crisis, is being published today as an Amazon Kindle Single. Please...[read more]

Can Geoengineering Combat Climate Change?

October 18, 2011 by Silvio Marcacci

Climate change threatens an increasing list of worst-case scenarios: melting ice caps, rising sea levels, longer droughts, and more violent storms. Climate scientists have largely focused on reducing emissions to counter global warming, but a growing number view geoengineering as the Earth’s last, best line of defense.[read more]

The Business of Cooling The Planet

October 10, 2011 by Marc Gunther

Global Thermostat's demonstration plant The risk of disruptive climate change grows every day. John Holdren, the White House science advisor, said last year that we have three options: Mitigate, adapt, suffer. If we don’t mitigate (meaning reduce emissions), we’ll have to adapt (move to new places, develop new crops, build sea walls)....[read more]

It’s Time For The U.S. To Study Geoengineering

October 6, 2011 by Marc Gunther

Geoengineering — deliberate, planetary-scale efforts to counter the impact of climate change — is so controversial that a high-powered 18-member Washington task force that spent almost two years studying the idea couldn’t decide what to call it.[read more]

What Is Your Energy Philosophy?

August 31, 2011 by Barry Brook
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People seem to like to infer motives. (Perhaps it’s an inherent evolutionary trait, allowing anticipation of your prey’s or predator’s next move?) I find that a lot of people get me wrong about my position on energy and sustainability — often deliberately so, I suspect. So here’s a post to clarify my position, and allow you to let others...[read more]

Plastic “Trees” Convert Atmospheric CO2

August 15, 2011 by Silvio Marcacci
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Recycling has always meant reusing materials like glass or plastic, and reducing atmospheric carbon has traditionally meant cutting emissions, but what if we could combine the two to make combating climate change profitable by recycling carbon out of the atmosphere? energyNOW! correspondent Josh Zepps looked into a new technology that could pull a thousand times more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere than trees, and could one day power our cars and trucks with green gasoline.[read more]

All of The Above

August 8, 2011 by Gernot Wagner

When most talk climate policy, they talk mitigation: decrease our ever increasing flow of carbon into the atmospheric sewer. Another piece of the puzzle is adaptation. We are way past the point where mitigation alone will do. We know we’ll feel the consequences of global warming for years, decades, and centuries to come. That’s why we...[read more]

In Memoriam: Steve Schneider Takes On Skeptics

July 21, 2011 by Gernot Wagner
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If you think things are bad, listen to a group of climate scientists talk about geoengineering—literally hacking the planet. I had the pleasure of attending the Asimolar geoengineering conference last March and, while there, had the distinct pleasure of spending some time with Steve Schneider. Even among a group of some of the world’s...[read more]