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changing fuel sources

Natural Gas, Solar, and Wind Led Power Plant Capacity Additions in the First Half of 2014

September 12, 2014 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

Power Plant Capacity Additions

In the first six months of 2014, 4,350 megawatts (MW) of new utility-scale generating capacity came online. Natural gas plants, almost all combined-cycle plants, made up more than half of the additions, while solar plants contributed more than a quarter and wind plants around one-sixth.[read more]

New England Relying More on Natural Gas Along with Hydroelectric Imports from Canada

August 31, 2014 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

New England Energy Resources

Electric operators in New England have been both generating more electricity from natural gas and importing more hydroelectric generation from Quebec over the past decade. These two sources of electricity are displacing the use of coal and oil as generation fuels in New England.[read more]

Natural Gas Serves a Small, but Growing, Portion of China's Total Energy Demand

August 24, 2014 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

China and Natural Gas

China relies heavily on domestic coal (and to a lesser extent oil) to meet rising energy consumption. To reduce air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions, the Chinese government is attempting to replace some of the country's coal and oil use with natural gas.[read more]

Chinese Coal Consumption Just Fell For The First Time This Century

August 19, 2014 by Justin Guay
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China and Coal Consumption

There may be a light at the end of the long dark tunnel of Chinese coal consumption: It appears China's coal boom is over. While positive signs have been emerging from China for well over a year, it appears the 'war on pollution' is not just talk.[read more]

ERCOT Report Shows Continued Cut Backs on Coal Reliance and Increases in Natural Gas and Renewables

July 19, 2014 by Carlee Quintas
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Changing Energy Industry

 

Over the next 20 years the role that coal plays in providing power to Texas will continue to diminish, perhaps just not as fast as experts had hoped. Rising prices of natural gas have slowed coal's reduction putting it's numbers at about 23% of the Texas energy generation capacity.[read more]