Storage

2015: A Turning Point for Energy?

February 9, 2016 by Geoffrey Styles

Was the Past Year an Energy Turning Point?

When I sifted through the major energy developments of 2015, I was surprised by the number of references I found to last year as a turning point, whether for the oil industry, the response to climate change, coal-fired electricity generation, or renewable energy.[read more]

BLM's Proposal To Reduce Methane: Why It Matters For America

February 9, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange

BLM and Methane

More than 90 percent of oil and gas production on BLM lands comes from the Western U.S. The tax and royalty revenue generated by this production is used to fund local infrastructure needs – schools, roads and other improvements — in rural and tribal communities.[read more]

Is Carbon Capture for Natural Gas the Missing Climate Solution?

February 8, 2016 by Alex Gilbert
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Could Carbon Capture and Storage Work?

 

Natural gas with carbon capture and storage could be an ideal long-term cheap and reliable low-carbon energy source. When most people in energy policy or markets hear “carbon capture and storage” (CCS), they think of coal generation. And rightly so.[read more]

Electricity Generation from Renewable Sources Expected to Grow 9% This Year

February 8, 2016 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

Renewables and Electricity Generation

Electricity generated from utility-scale renewable plants is expected to grow by 9% in 2016, based on projections in the latest Short-Term Energy Outlook. Much of the growth comes from new installations of wind and solar plants and increases in hydroelectric generation after a relatively dry 2015.[read more]

Bipartisan Support for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development

February 7, 2016 by Rod Adams

Nuclear and Third Way

Third Way bills itself as a centrist think tank that is not satisfied with just thinking; they take action that gets results. The Jan 27th Advanced Nuclear Summit and Showcase provided an excellent example of Third Way’s ability to seek common ground among people from both major political parties in the United States.[read more]

Going Off Grid: Tata Researchers Tackle Rural Electrification

February 5, 2016 by Energy @ MIT

Rural Electrification

More than 300 million people in India have no access to grid electricity, and the problem is especially acute in rural communities, which can be difficult and expensive to reach with grid power. But researchers are exploring ways to extend electricity access to such communities using microgrids.[read more]

High Inventories Help Push Crude Oil Prices to Lowest Levels in 13 Years

February 5, 2016 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

Crude Oil Inventories

Several factors have played a part in pushing U.S. crude oil prices below $30 per barrel (b), including high inventory levels of crude oil, uncertainty about global economic growth, volatility in equity and nonenergy commodity markets, and the potential for additional crude oil supply to enter the market.[read more]

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FERC vs. EPSA Ruling: A Win for Demand Response and Energy Storage

February 4, 2016 by Clean Energy Leadership Institute

Demand Response Ruling

Demand Response and Energy Storage companies will benefit enormously from the Supreme Court's recent decision to uphold Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's authority to regulate demand response programs in wholesale markets.[read more]

Why Oil Under $30 per Barrel is a Major Problem

February 4, 2016 by Gail Tverberg
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Cheap Oil Risks

A person often reads that things like the current trend of low oil prices – for example, $30 per barrel oil prices – will actually stimulate the economy, and the economy will soon bounce back. But what is wrong with this story? A lot of things, as I see it.[read more]

Fatal Flaws In EPA's Latest Voluntary Methane Program Highlight Need For Concrete Rules

February 4, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange

EPA and Methane Regulation

The Natural Gas STAR Methane Challenge Program unveiled last week by the United States Environmental Protection Agency is a perfect example of what can go wrong when the agency tries too hard to entice an unwilling industry to engage.[read more]

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Using Clean Power To Get Off The Grid

January 28, 2016 by Ryan Kh

Energy Savings and Grid Reliance

Clean energy is now more of a reality than ever before and there are so many options out there for people looking to go green. So, we thought we’d create some great green alternative energy tips for you to use to make your home a more eco-friendly one.[read more]

Economics of Batteries for Stabilizing and Storage on Distribution Grids

January 15, 2016 by Willem Post
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In the future, there will be much less consumption of energy from fossil fuels, and increasing annual percentages of PV solar energy on distribution grids. Those percentages may become as high as 33% of ALL energy. Any rational planning and design of energy systems, and the systems of the users, should be based on the world's fossil fuel bank account being depleted in not too distant future. Technologies are evolving to enable more generation closer to the user. Future buildings must be much more energy efficient regarding heating, cooling and electricity. Buildings must be at least “net-zero-energy”, but “energy surplus” would be better to offset building energy requirements, and to power electric heat pumps and charge electric cars. That means the role of the distribution grid would increase, and of the high voltage grid would decrease, but not eliminated.[read more]

ARPA-E Funds the Next Wave of Grid-Distributed Energy Integration

January 6, 2016 by Jeff St. John
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ARPA-E and Energy Integration

Over the past year, the Department of Energy has been putting an increased focus on technology to integrate renewable energy into everyday grid operations. This work has included opening loan guarantees to distributed renewables, and grants to support field tests of distributed energy integration.[read more]

Grading My 2015 Energy Predictions

January 5, 2016 by Robert Rapier
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The funny thing about predictions is that things are always obvious in hindsight. I rarely have people suggest that any of my predictions are either “no-brainers” or “impossible” when I make them. But when it comes time to grade them, I hear that a lot.[read more]

The Not in My Backyard Syndrome and Sustainability Infrastructure

January 5, 2016 by Steven Cohen

As our communities have gotten more crowded and transportation become more congested, it has become more difficult to site major facilities for waste management, water supply, sewage treatment, mass transit, and pretty much anything from a Big Box store to a homeless shelter.[read more]