Carbon and De-carbonization

BLM Tackles Waste, Methane Pollution on Federal and Tribal Lands

February 6, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange

Waste on Tribal Lands

In an important step forward in curbing methane emissions from the nation’s oil and gas sector, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) recently announced a regulatory proposal aimed at wasteful practices that shortchange taxpayers, squander energy resources and threaten the Earth’s climate.[read more]

Understanding the Clean Energy Incentive Program

February 5, 2016 by Frank Swigonski

Clean Energy Incentives and Analysis

EPA’s greenhouse gas regulation, the Clean Power Plan, won’t take effect until 2022, but planning is already well underway in states across the country. Initial state compliance plans are due in September of this year but many states will opt for an extension and submit final plans in 2018.[read more]

Preventing Future Aliso Canyon-Sized Gas Leaks: the Importance of Well Integrity

February 5, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange

Leaks and Well Integrity

Southern California is now in month three of one of the country’s worst environmental disasters. In October 2015, a natural gas storage well operated by SoCal Gas sprung a massive leak hundreds of feet underground, releasing nearly 1,400 tons of gas into the air each day at its peak.[read more]

Keystone Redux: TransCanada is Now Seeking An Ocean Route for its Dirty Tar Sands

February 5, 2016 by Danielle Droitsch

Tar Sands Risks

The company that eventually lost a bid to build the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline (and has filed a lawsuit against the United States government for $15 billion for lost profits) is eyeing to get its tar sands oil to the Gulf Coast another way: by sea.[read more]

A Global Agreement on Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

February 5, 2016 by Henry Auer

Paris Agreement and Greenhouse Gases

2015 was the warmest year on record, using temperatures measured over the entire year on both land and ocean surfaces. The high temperatures averaged worldwide have produced large numbers of extreme weather events, especially heat waves, over the last five years.[read more]

Good News: China's Dropping Coal Consumption Is Putting the Brakes on Global Carbon Emissions

February 4, 2016 by Barbara Finamore

China, Coal, and Emissions

New analysis finds that China holds the key to achieving the 2 degree Celsius global climate goal reaffirmed by 195 countries in Paris. According to research by Barclays Bank, China accounts for 33-40 percent of the carbon emissions gap between current trends and a 2 degree Celsius pathway.[read more]

Fatal Flaws In EPA's Latest Voluntary Methane Program Highlight Need For Concrete Rules

February 4, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange

EPA and Methane Regulation

The Natural Gas STAR Methane Challenge Program unveiled last week by the United States Environmental Protection Agency is a perfect example of what can go wrong when the agency tries too hard to entice an unwilling industry to engage.[read more]

China Coal Use Falls for Second Year in a Row: IEA Boss

February 3, 2016 by Tyler Hamilton

China Coal Consumption

Driven mostly by a need to get local air pollution under control, China has put a 2020 cap on coal emissions. Less economic emphasis is being put on energy-intensive industries such as steel manufacturing and big investment continues in renewables.[read more]

Delhi's Air Pollution Problem: Did the Odd-Even Scheme Work?

February 3, 2016 by Johannes Urpelainen

Air Pollution in Delhi

The topic that dominated the public debate in Delhi during my visit was the city government’s “odd-even scheme,” under which even (odd) numbered cars were only allowed to hit the road on even-numbered dates. The scheme was a pilot that lasted only for two weeks.[read more]

2015 Goes out with a Burst of New Efficiency Standards: 2016 Promises More Action

The final few weeks of 2015 proved busy ones for new national appliance and equipment standards. The Department of Energy (DOE) completed the biggest energy-saving standard in agency history, along with several important but lower-profile standards which will collectively yield large energy and economic savings. Some of them point the way to much larger future savings. Looking ahead, 2016 looks to be another big year for saving energy and money with improved standards.[read more]

The California Gas Disaster: What Comes Next and Where Else Could it Happen?

January 15, 2016 by EDF Energy Exchange
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The ongoing leak at the Aliso Canyon natural gas facility owned by Southern California Gas has driven more than 2,000 families from their homes in the Porter Ranch area of Los Angeles and prompted Gov. Brown to declare a state of emergency. It’s dumped an estimated 83 thousand metric tons of methane into the atmosphere so far (see our leak counter here), with no clear end in sight.[read more]

After Paris, It's Time for Canada to Finally Join IRENA

January 14, 2016 by Tyler Hamilton

IRENA is the International Renewable Energy Agency, a UN-affiliated organization established in 2009 to promote awareness and growth of renewable energy technologies on the global stage. It’s a kind of counter-balance to existing agencies that have long represented the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. The idea for IRENA goes as far back as 1981, but it took a quarter century to get the political traction it needed.[read more]

Sacramento Has the Most Net Zero Buildings of Any City in America

January 13, 2016 by Katherine Tweed
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California has more than half of the net zero buildings in the U.S., according to a new survey from the Net-Zero Energy Coalition. The survey is the first effort to catalog all of the zero energy buildings in North America.[read more]

What Energy Efficiency Can Learn From Solar, Uber and Spotify

January 11, 2016 by Jeff St. John
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The business model shift driving growth in digital music, solar panels, and other consumer technologies is poised to have the same impact on commercial energy efficiency in the United States.[read more]

America’s Coal Production Falls to Its Lowest Level Since 1986

January 11, 2016 by Stephen Lacey
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The U.S. saw a 10 percent dip in coal production in 2015, part of a downward trend that continues to accelerate. That's the lowest level since 1986.[read more]