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Coal

Deniers Mistakenly Say that Global Warming Has Ended

October 20, 2014 by Henry Auer
4

Climate Denial and Global Warming

The global average temperature has increased by about 0.7-0.8ºC over pre-industrial temps. A pause of annual global temperatures began after 1997 even though the atmospheric concentration of CO2 continued to increase. Global warming deniers have seized on this to say that warming of the Earth has ended.[read more]

Still No Sign of the Rational Middle?

October 20, 2014 by David Hone
5

Energy and Politics

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott turned up in Queensland very recently to open a coal mine. In an interview he managed to inflame a number of commentators around the world with his quote that “Coal is good for humanity, coal is good for prosperity, coal is an essential part of our economic future."[read more]

Energy Master Limited Partnerships Go Mainstream: Baird's Ethan Bellamy

October 18, 2014 by Jim Patrick

Ethan Bellamy specializes in the analysis of master limited partnerships at Robert W. Baird & Co. He was director of research for the Lehman Brothers MLP Opportunity Fund, where he was responsible for fundamental analysis and due diligence in public, PIPE and pre-IPO investments in natural resources.[read more]

The Planet Just Had Its Hottest September On Record

October 17, 2014 by Joseph Romm
4

September Temp Record

Last month was the warmest September globally since records began being kept in 1880, NASA reported. January through September data have 2014 already at the third warmest on record. Projections by NOAA make clear 2014 is taking aim at hottest year on record.[read more]

Friday Energy Facts: Net Energy Imports as Share of Consumption at Lowest Level in 29 Years

October 17, 2014 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

Energy Imports and Consumption

U.S. net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption fell to their lowest level in 29 years for the first six months of 2014. Energy consumption in the first half of 2014 was 3% above consumption during the first six months of 2013, but consumption growth was outpaced by increases in total energy production.[read more]

Former Indian Minister for Rural Development Discusses India's 'Growth Imperative' and Energy Future

October 17, 2014 by Energy @ MIT
4

India Growth and Planning

Former Indian Minister for Rural Development Jairam Ramesh gave a talk at MIT entitled “The Growth Imperative: Plotting a Sustainable Energy Future for India.” Ramesh drew on his years of experience as a leader in the Indian government to discuss India's energy policies and plans.[read more]

Will a Dirty Coal Plant in Kosovo Spoil the Clean Energy Record of Dr. Kim and World Bank?

October 16, 2014 by Justin Guay
3

Kosovo and Coal Plants

For the fourth year in a row, the World Bank's investments are coal-free. But the real test of the strength of this commitment to carbon divestment will come when the bank decides whether or not to fund the Kosovo C coal-fired power plant in Kosovo.[read more]

North Carolina is Well-Positioned for the EPA's Clean Power Plan

October 15, 2014 by EDF Energy Exchange
3

North Carolina and the Clean Power Plan

A majority of Americans endorse setting limits on carbon emissions from the nation's power plants, which account for the single largest source of carbon pollution in the U.S. The United States is on the verge of doing just that with EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan.[read more]

Costing Damages from Climate Change Offers Only a Partial Guide to Choice of Policy

October 15, 2014 by Adam Whitmore

Many of the costs of climate change are omitted from models, essentially assuming that they are zero. For example, knock-on effects, such as regional conflict from the migration of refugees, are often not modeled, but may be among the largest costs of climate change.[read more]

The Multibillion Dollar Question: How to Spend Carbon Revenues?

October 14, 2014 by Meredith Fowlie
2

Carbon Revenue Spending

Debates over carbon pricing policies tend to focus on the costs imposed on firms and households. When a carbon tax or cap and trade program is introduced, firms see energy-related operating costs rise, drivers pay more at the pump, households see the prices of energy, and energy-intensive goods, tick up.[read more]

Should the Climate Movement Turn Down the Radicalism?

October 13, 2014 by Neil Stenhouse
15

Climate Activism and Radicals

The People’s Climate March was an enormous success. Months of hard work by thousands of people from all across the country resulted in the largest climate protest ever. Bigger and better than the Forward on Climate rally in DC in 2013. That said, I was ambivalent about some aspects of the march.[read more]

Charting China's Carbon Horizon

October 13, 2014 by Lucas Bifera

Carbon, China, and the Future

Discussions around China’s carbon emissions reached a fever pitch throughout September’s UN Climate Summit, punctuated by a new report from the Global Carbon Project estimating the country’s total emissions at 9.9 billion metric tons of CO2 (MTCO2) in 2013, or 28% of the global total.[read more]

Texas Comptroller's New Report Should Not Play Favorites

October 12, 2014 by EDF Energy Exchange

Texas Energy Report

The Texas Comptroller decided to come out swinging against renewable energy, specifically wind, in a report entitled Texas Power Challenge: Getting the Most From Your Energy Dollars. It would be easier to take this report seriously if it applied the same pressure and scrutiny to the oil, gas, and coal industries.[read more]

People's Climate March: What’s the Impact?

October 11, 2014 by Johannes Urpelainen

While the energy and enthusiasm at the People's Climate March was great, the reason for the march was that we want to see more ambitious policies. The march itself does not reduce emissions, but it may draw more attention to climate change and send a signal to decision-makers that action is required.[read more]

Future Energy Fellows post

Qatar's Gas Powered Politics

October 10, 2014 by Imran MacMillan

Qatar has built a sphere of commercial and diplomatic ties through gas export deals, strategic investments, conflict mediation and financially backing particular political regimes. If the emirate has one weakness, it is overexposure: Qatar’s activist diplomacy has invited scrutiny from leaders and allies alike.[read more]