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Energy and the New Congress: Beyond Keystone

December 1, 2014 by Geoffrey Styles
5

The Keystone XL pipeline has been under review by the Executive Branch for six years, yet despite its symbolic importance to both sides of the debate, and an apparent majority in both houses of the newly elected Congress favoring its construction, its future remains uncertain.[read more]

Sub-National Climate Change Actions Prevail Over National Politics

November 25, 2014 by Devashree Saha

In the US, national politics has not been friendly to the climate debate and partisan gridlock and dysfunction have routinely affected any serious response to climate change. With national action remaining tepid, it has fallen to sub-national actors to embrace and enact meaningful climate change policies.[read more]

Post-Election Day, Tax Extenders Will Be a Bipartisan Opportunity

November 2, 2014 by Tom Carlson

Elections and Tax Law

Though Senate movement on passing tax extenders came to a standstill in May, both parties have since shown interest in pushing the issue forward during the lame duck session. There is no question that extending advanced energy tax credits is both vital to industry and has bipartisan support.[read more]

Congress Likely to Punt Major Issues To Lame Duck

September 8, 2014 by Tom Carlson

Congressional Inaction

Congress will return to Washington on Monday, but expectations for action are low. With the mid-term elections two months away, Congress will be in session for only 12 days in September and October this year. It’s likely most major issues will be punted until the lame duck session in November.[read more]

Showdown, then Breakdown, on Transportation Lawmaking in Congress

August 11, 2014 by NRDC Switchboard

Transportation Legislation

Heading out the door for their 5-week vacation this August, Congress wrapped up a major piece of transportation business in an all-too-familiar and depressing fashion. They passed a bill applying set of band-aids to the highway trust fund, allowing it to limp forward until May of next year.[read more]

Our Dysfunctional National Government Is Incapable of Building a Sustainable Economy

August 5, 2014 by Steven Cohen
2

Trends in American politics lead away from democracy, moderate demands for change, and inhibit working with the private sector to bring about a sustainable economy. These include unlimited money in politics, gerrymandered congressional districts, and the media environment we now experience.[read more]

Federal Budget Stunts like Blocking Enforcement of Light Bulb Standards Put U.S. Jobs at Risk

July 10, 2014 by NRDC Switchboard

Federal Budgets and Light Bulb Standards

The Republican-backed federal spending bill is set to become a vehicle for a number of misguided legislative maneuvers wholly unrelated to the budget and aimed at blocking programs that help Americans save energy while cutting harmful pollution.[read more]

Calling on Congress to Help Low-Income Natural Gas Customers

June 15, 2014 by Christina Nyquist

Calling on Congress

Since 2010, funding for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) has dropped by nearly $2 billion and the President’s budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 calls for just $2.8 billion – less than half of the $5.1 billion allocated in FY2010.[read more]

EPA's Proposed Greenhouse Gas Regulation: Why are Conservatives Attacking its Market-Based Options?

June 9, 2014 by Robert Stavins
1

Professor Richard Schmalensee and I told the sordid tale of how conservatives in Congress who once supported cap and trade had come to lambast climate change legislation as “cap-and-tax.” Ironically, in doing this, conservatives have chosen to demonize their own market-based creation.[read more]

Following the Money: Energy Dollars Hard at Work on Capitol Hill

May 6, 2014 by Bill Chameides

Lobbying and the Energy Industry

 

Is the alternative energy industry losing the influence-peddling war to fossil fuels? Perhaps you caught the editorial in Sunday’s New York Times taking “the Koch Brothers and their conservative allies” to task for “spending heavily to fight incentives for renewable energy.”[read more]

Physicist And Congressman Rush Holt On Keystone XL: Tar Sands 'Sludge' Is 'A Climate Poison'

March 7, 2014 by Joseph Romm
1

Congressman Rush Holt

Rush Holt (D-NJ) saddened scientists and climate hawks everywhere when he announced last month he would retire at the end of his (eighth) term in Congress. Holt brought the unique sensibility of a research physicist to a body that has become increasingly hostile towards science.[read more]

Strong Support for Clean Energy, and the Jobs It Creates, Crosses Party Lines

February 9, 2014 by Peter Lehner
2

Clean Energy Jobs

A new report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) says the renewable energy industry is responsible for 615,000 jobs in the United States. That’s hundreds of thousands of Americans working to provide this country with clean energy from wind, sun and plants.[read more]

exclusive

Wind Energy Projects Rush to Start Construction in Advance of Expiring Tax Credit (Again)

December 9, 2013 by Jesse Jenkins

Wind Energy and Tax Credits

It’s December, and that means the wind power industry in the United States is in the middle of what has become an all-to-frequent holiday season tradition: the mad dash to get projects in the ground before the impending expiration of a federal production tax credit worth $23 per megawatt-hour.[read more]

Climate Change Bills in the 113th Congress

November 25, 2013 by Jason Ye
1

The first year of the 113th Congress (2013-2014) draws to a close with no passage of climate-specific legislation, but signs that some in Congress understand the importance of addressing this issue. More bills were introduced that support climate action than oppose it.[read more]

Does Future National Energy Legislation Depend on the Success of an Efficiency Bill?

November 22, 2013 by Stephen Lacey

It’s been more than five years since Congress passed a national energy bill. But that doesn’t mean legislators stopped trying. There have been four attempts from Democrats to introduce a national renewable energy standard, with no traction at all. And then there was the cap and trade bill, which imploded in 2010.[read more]