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congress

Climate of Incivility

Raul Grijalva, a Democratic Congressman from Arizona, sent letters to seven university presidents, asking them to release information on funding sources for university professors. One of the professors under investigation is Roger Pielke, Jr. The problem is that Grijalva’s beef with Pielke is plainly ideological.[read more]

Keystone XL Pipeline Veto: Right Decision at the Right Time

February 27, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard
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Obama and the Keystone Veto

We don't need Congress to be a pipeline permitting agency. And, there's a good process in place that lets president decide whether transboundary energy projects are in the national interest. The Keystone pipeline has repeatedly been shown to be dangerous to our water, communities, and climate.[read more]

exclusive

Obama's Keystone Veto Message: "If You've Got a Business, You Can't Build That Infrastructure Project"

February 26, 2015 by John Miller
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Obama and the Keystone Veto

 

President Barack Obama has vetoed a bipartisan Congressional piece of legislation that aims to finally approve the Keystone XL pipeline project at the Federal level. Why does the President continue to block and delay this energy project’s permit decision?[read more]

Business Interests and the Waxman-Markey Climate Bill: Who Lobbied?

February 11, 2015 by Johannes Urpelainen

In recent American environmental policy, the most important period of lobbying by business was undoubtedly the 2009 effort to enact a comprehensive federal climate policy: the Waxman-Markey bill.The legislation passed the House but failed in the Senate. The legislation was the subject of much business interest.[read more]

Future Energy Fellows post

The Keystone Showdown: #EnergyChat on the Final Chapter of the Pipeline Fight

February 7, 2015 by Jesse Jenkins
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The years-long fight over the Keystone XL pipeline appears to be entering its final chapter. The new Congress recently passed legislation requiring the Obama Administration to approve it. Now the President must decide whether or not to make good on a threat to veto any bill forcing his hand on the issue.[read more]

Keystone XL: Let's Make a Megadeal and Get Congress to Fulfill a Cleantech Wishlist

January 22, 2015 by Matt Stewart
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A proposal: let’s make a megadeal. Authorize Keystone XL. But in return, it’s time for clean energy advocates to play hardball — and get something meaningful in return for it. In fact, get a lot meaningful for it. This is the time to break out the cleantech-policy Christmas lists.[read more]

Energy Quote of the Day: Keystone XL Decision Still a Ways Off

January 11, 2015 by Jared Anderson
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Keystone Decision Delays

It was a big day in Keystone XL news recently, with the House voting to approve a pipeline construction bill – the president already said he would veto – and the Nebraska Supreme Court mostly blessing the controversial oil transport project. But a final decision could still be months away.[read more]

Keystone XL Veto Threat: Does 'No' Really Mean No?

January 8, 2015 by Christina Nunez
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The White House announced Tuesday that President Barack Obama would veto a Senate bill aimed at greenlighting the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. A veto would likely extend the already tortuous six-year path for the proposed pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to refineries on the Gulf Coast.[read more]

New Year's Message to Congress on U.S. Energy Independence and Exports: Do No Harm

January 5, 2015 by Amy Myers Jaffe

When asked about the Republican agenda for 2015, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky) is promising a “full-throated” debate on national energy policy. That worries me because ultimately, our energy situation is already moving in the right direction.[read more]

Energy and the New Congress: Beyond Keystone

December 1, 2014 by Geoffrey Styles
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The Keystone XL pipeline has been under review by the Executive Branch for six years, yet despite its symbolic importance to both sides of the debate, and an apparent majority in both houses of the newly elected Congress favoring its construction, its future remains uncertain.[read more]

Sub-National Climate Change Actions Prevail Over National Politics

November 25, 2014 by Devashree Saha

In the US, national politics has not been friendly to the climate debate and partisan gridlock and dysfunction have routinely affected any serious response to climate change. With national action remaining tepid, it has fallen to sub-national actors to embrace and enact meaningful climate change policies.[read more]

Post-Election Day, Tax Extenders Will Be a Bipartisan Opportunity

November 2, 2014 by Tom Carlson

Elections and Tax Law

Though Senate movement on passing tax extenders came to a standstill in May, both parties have since shown interest in pushing the issue forward during the lame duck session. There is no question that extending advanced energy tax credits is both vital to industry and has bipartisan support.[read more]

Congress Likely to Punt Major Issues To Lame Duck

September 8, 2014 by Tom Carlson

Congressional Inaction

Congress will return to Washington on Monday, but expectations for action are low. With the mid-term elections two months away, Congress will be in session for only 12 days in September and October this year. It’s likely most major issues will be punted until the lame duck session in November.[read more]

Showdown, then Breakdown, on Transportation Lawmaking in Congress

August 11, 2014 by NRDC Switchboard

Transportation Legislation

Heading out the door for their 5-week vacation this August, Congress wrapped up a major piece of transportation business in an all-too-familiar and depressing fashion. They passed a bill applying set of band-aids to the highway trust fund, allowing it to limp forward until May of next year.[read more]

Our Dysfunctional National Government Is Incapable of Building a Sustainable Economy

August 5, 2014 by Steven Cohen
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Trends in American politics lead away from democracy, moderate demands for change, and inhibit working with the private sector to bring about a sustainable economy. These include unlimited money in politics, gerrymandered congressional districts, and the media environment we now experience.[read more]