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On Why Does Politics Keep Getting in the Way of Pricing Carbon? - Part 1

Bob, stay tuned for part 2...

July 23, 2014    View Comment    

On Why Does Politics Keep Getting in the Way of Pricing Carbon? - Part 1

Hi Schalk and thanks for the comment,

"Skepticism" of climate change is indeed one factor in public opposition to strong carbon pricing policies. However, I personally believe the role skeptics play in climate policy debates is a bit overblown. The more fundamental economic interests are more powerful I believe, and I think the public opinion evidence would support that interpretation, as in most nations I've looked at, and particularly in the United States, we see strong majorities believe that climate change represents a problem to be addressed, but fairly weak support for expenditures or costs associated with confronting that challenge. Yes, there are more skeptics among the conservative portions of the US (and other) populations. I'd recommend the "Six Americas" series of studies for more on that. But I also think that this expression of skepticism may also be a case of "motivated cognition" - that is, if the idea of confronting climate change creates cognitive dissonance with your beliefs, worldview, or personal interests, one has a strong motivation to develop a rationale and understanding of the problem that reduces or eliminates that cognitive dissonance. This can easily manifest as skepticism of the underlying science or risk. Anyway, the role of "skeptics" in climate politics is a very interesting topic, and one I'd love to hear more informed views on from those who may have spent time researching this topic. Cheers,

Jesse

July 21, 2014    View Comment    

On Why Does Politics Keep Getting in the Way of Pricing Carbon? - Part 1

Indeed! Stay tuned for part 2...

July 21, 2014    View Comment    

On Climate Change and the American Economy

Echoing Eli here, EP, please keep the discussion civil. It's been a great and substantive back and forth so far in this chain. No need to assert what others have or have not "studied" or "know," which treds into the realm of personal attack which we don't tolerate here at the Energy Collective. Thanks!

Jesse

June 9, 2014    View Comment    

On Renewable Wood Fuels, Part 2: Environmentally Beneficial or a Chronic Problem?

On a related note, EIA notes today that U.S. exports of wood pellets doubled this year, primarily to meet growing European demand for biomass...

May 22, 2014    View Comment    

On What's the Greenest Car? An Extremely Short Guide to Vehicle Emissions

Thanks for the reply Lindsay.

April 28, 2014    View Comment    

On What's the Greenest Car? An Extremely Short Guide to Vehicle Emissions

Hi Lindsay,

How large is the EV you are comparing to the petrol vehicles? There's of course a range of "fuel" efficiencies for electric vehicles too, having to do with their curb weight, power, and aerodynamics, just like there are for petrol vehicles. So wondering if you're comparing apples to apples here. 

Jesse

April 27, 2014    View Comment    

On Can Nuclear Power and Renewable Energy Learn to Get Along?

We all know those arguments well here. There have been hundreds of posts at this site hashing out those issues. So please, if you don't want to have this particular conversation, then don't. No one is forcing you to.

As I've told other commenters, please stay on topic for this discussion thread, or refrain from commenting. The question here is not do you specifically want nuclear or renewables? Your answer is clear. Others disagree. That's not what were discussing in this specific post. The question is, if a nation decided it wanted both nuclear and renewables, could they work together?

April 23, 2014    View Comment    

On Can Nuclear Power and Renewable Energy Learn to Get Along?

It sounds like you'd like the paper Charles Fosberg references below... 

April 17, 2014    View Comment    

On Can Nuclear Power and Renewable Energy Learn to Get Along?

As I've told a couple other commenters: please keep the discussion focused on the question at hand. This isn't the right forum to air your views on nuclear or renewables. The question is can they work together. Not do you want them to work together. 

To keep things off topic, I'm going to prune this part of the thread of off-topic comments. I mean no disrespect to those posting their strong beliefs about nuclear power (one way or the other), but I don't want this comment thread to devolve into another battle over nuclear. I hope everyone understands. Thanks,

Jesse

April 17, 2014    View Comment    

On Can Nuclear Power and Renewable Energy Learn to Get Along?

Thanks for the comment Charles. I'll add that paper to the resources link above and take a look myself as soon as I get a chance. Cheers,

Jesse

April 17, 2014    View Comment