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On Clean and Reliable, But Not so Cheap: Is the Nuclear Renaissance About to Get a Reboot in the UK?

The key to nuclear power is more plants, rather than less. Also, I wonder how all the importation of Hydro from Norweigh would work when as I suspect many other European countries are looking at the same source.

October 24, 2014    View Comment    

On Pentagon Sees Climate Change as Immediate Security Risk

So, Where is the "Immediate Security Risk?"

October 20, 2014    View Comment    

On While Critics Debate Energiewende, Germany is Gaining a Global Advantage

Clayton, Most who opposed Ocean Liners did so "for the highly infrequent, catstrophic accidents" like The Titanic, or The Lusitania. Today we could oppose Skyscrapers, like The Twin Towers for instance for the same reasons.

In both instances, the solution is to engineer better Ocean Liners, and Better Skyscraper, and if you want to add more examples, we engineer better Airliners.

Some could have argued that fears of Ocean Liners, Skyscrapers, or Airliners were rational, and allowance for better engineering was unneccessary. The difference of course is that with Nuclear Power, there are people with irrationaly vested interests who cultishly oppose nuclear power regardless of the engineering now or in the future.

October 16, 2014    View Comment    

On California Drought Leads to Less Hydropower, Increased Natural Gas Generation

Thanksforclarifying that. My impression was that California forced them to shut down due to pressure from actvists, which I suppose indirectly happened.

October 13, 2014    View Comment    

On California Drought Leads to Less Hydropower, Increased Natural Gas Generation

No, I can't speak for the almighty, but what I am saying is that they dug their own grave with the effects of lower electricity from reservoirs by shutting down SONGS. California would have suffered less from the effects of the drought had they not shut down SONGS.

Californians should understand the they will not be immune from reaping the effects of the actions they have sown, Just Like My KIds.

October 13, 2014    View Comment    

On California Drought Leads to Less Hydropower, Increased Natural Gas Generation

I find myself suffering very little, and sheding very few tears for California. If asked I would tell them the same thing I told my kids when they were little kids: "You reap excactly what you sow."

October 12, 2014    View Comment    

On Did the "People's Climate" March Leave Conservatives on the Sidelines?

Bob,

I generally keep out of politics as much as possible,  but as much as I agree with you on so many many topics, I find your attitude toward republicans too strident. I am glad you love the National Parks, (so also do I and so also do most republicans), although I am very disinterested in reading about republican points of view and bills from The Huffington Post.

Tax breaks to coal/oil/gas are more interesting as a topic, however since we all still depend on these sources, and  those who wish to cut them off also generally pretend that renewables will make up the difference, we are again at odds.

October 10, 2014    View Comment    

On Drought Reveals Water-Energy Connection, Cutting California's Hydropower in Half

Are they missing San Onofre yet.? I doubt they are seeing as ideological decisions are seldom rolled back.

October 9, 2014    View Comment    

On While Critics Debate Energiewende, Germany is Gaining a Global Advantage

I am curious, are you now contrite to have made a demonstrably unfounded accusation, and mischaracterisation of Bob's comment?

October 9, 2014    View Comment    

On The Transition to Renewable Energy is Difficult but Feasible

1) Nuclear was owned by FF interests.....I would very much love to see or read some references please. As far as I know GE is not a FF interest.

2) It is my understanding that New design, new types of Nuclear power, other than those currently approved have a hell of a time getting past regulatory obstacles.


October 8, 2014    View Comment    

On Virginia Utilities Pull Out of Collaboration Working on a Method to Value Solar Energy

Except that this page actually examines and discounts Gravitational heat, and a few other sources:-

 

"We don't think this original heat is a major part of the Earth's heat, though," Marone says. It only contributes 5 to 10 percent of the total, "about the same amount as gravitational heat."

 

To explain gravitational heat, Marone again evokes the image of the hot, freshly formed Earth, which was not of a consistent density. In a gravitational sorting process called differentiation, the denser, heavier parts were drawn to the center, and the less dense areas were displaced outwards. The friction created by this process generated considerable heat, which, like the original heat, still has not fully dissipated.

 

Then there's latent heat, Marone says. This type arises from the core's expanding as the Earth cools from the inside out. Just as freezing water turns to ice, that liquid metal is turning solid—and adding volume in the process. "The inner core is becoming larger by about a centimeter every thousand years," Marone says. The heat released by this expansion is seeping into the mantle.

 

However, I do acknowledge the possibility that this is not the final word on the matter, pending newer scientific discoveries.

October 8, 2014    View Comment    

On Virginia Utilities Pull Out of Collaboration Working on a Method to Value Solar Energy

Please read:-  "

For all this, however, Marone says, the vast majority of the heat in Earth's interior—up to 90 percent—is fueled by the decaying of radioactive isotopes like Potassium 40, Uranium 238, 235, and Thorium 232 contained within the mantle. These isotopes radiate heat as they shed excess energy and move toward stability. "The amount of heat caused by this radiation is almost the same as the total heat measured emanating from the Earth."

Radioactivity is present not only in the mantle, but in the rocks of Earth's crust. For example, Marone explains, a 1-kilogram block of granite on the surface emanates a tiny but measurable amount of heat (about as much as a .000000001 watt light bulb) through radioactive decay.

 

http://phys.org/news62952904.html

For all this, however, Marone says, the vast majority of the heat in Earth's interior—up to 90 percent—is fueled by the decaying of radioactive isotopes like Potassium 40, Uranium 238, 235, and Thorium 232 contained within the mantle. These isotopes radiate heat as they shed excess energy and move toward stability. "The amount of heat caused by this radiation is almost the same as the total heat measured emanating from the Earth."

Radioactivity is present not only in the mantle, but in the rocks of Earth's crust. For example, Marone explains, a 1-kilogram block of granite on the surface emanates a tiny but measurable amount of heat (about as much as a .000000001 watt light bulb) through radioactive decay.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news62952904.html#jCp

For all this, however, Marone says, the vast majority of the heat in Earth's interior—up to 90 percent—is fueled by the decaying of radioactive isotopes like Potassium 40, Uranium 238, 235, and Thorium 232 contained within the mantle. These isotopes radiate heat as they shed excess energy and move toward stability. "The amount of heat caused by this radiation is almost the same as the total heat measured emanating from the Earth."

Radioactivity is present not only in the mantle, but in the rocks of Earth's crust. For example, Marone explains, a 1-kilogram block of granite on the surface emanates a tiny but measurable amount of heat (about as much as a .000000001 watt light bulb) through radioactive decay.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news62952904.html#jCp

For all this, however, Marone says, the vast majority of the heat in Earth's interior—up to 90 percent—is fueled by the decaying of radioactive isotopes like Potassium 40, Uranium 238, 235, and Thorium 232 contained within the mantle. These isotopes radiate heat as they shed excess energy and move toward stability. "The amount of heat caused by this radiation is almost the same as the total heat measured emanating from the Earth."

Radioactivity is present not only in the mantle, but in the rocks of Earth's crust. For example, Marone explains, a 1-kilogram block of granite on the surface emanates a tiny but measurable amount of heat (about as much as a .000000001 watt light bulb) through radioactive decay.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news62952904.html#jCp

For all this, however, Marone says, the vast majority of the heat in Earth's interior—up to 90 percent—is fueled by the decaying of radioactive isotopes like Potassium 40, Uranium 238, 235, and Thorium 232 contained within the mantle. These isotopes radiate heat as they shed excess energy and move toward stability. "The amount of heat caused by this radiation is almost the same as the total heat measured emanating from the Earth."

Radioactivity is present not only in the mantle, but in the rocks of Earth's crust. For example, Marone explains, a 1-kilogram block of granite on the surface emanates a tiny but measurable amount of heat (about as much as a .000000001 watt light bulb) through radioactive decay.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news62952904.html#jCp
October 7, 2014    View Comment