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Comments by David Hone Subscribe

On Climate Change and the Energy World Map

Geoff,

Thanks for the comment. I agree, there is historical precedent for this, but the social permission to do it is a huge challenge. However, there is also a social permission challenge to overcome for CCS, but I don't think it is quite as big.

David

June 17, 2013    View Comment    

On Climate Change: Looking at 400 ppm and Beyond

Dear IK,

I think we all know that the base line in this case is much closer to 300 ppm than 0 ppm.

David

May 20, 2013    View Comment    

On An Update on Climate Change Legislation

Edward,

I must confess that my response was partly emotive, but I also wonder weather the earth/ocean/ice system can change at such a fast rate. Even at elevated temperatures the global ice-pack will take a very long time to melt. Surely that melting will act as a major heat sink for a thousand or more years due to the latent heat of fusion.

In any case, I will have a look at the material you have pointed to.

David

January 21, 2013    View Comment    

On An Update on Climate Change Legislation

I wasn't suggesting it has stopped - just following up on my previous post where I disagreed with the claim that it has. However, I also can't accept the view that extinction by mid-century is even a remote possibility. The legislative pathway is feasible, but looking very challenging the actions we see in almost every country. Although numerous countries are starting to act, it may well be too little, too late and without a strong focus on CCS, quite likely the wrong action anyway.

January 20, 2013    View Comment    

On An Update on Climate Change Legislation

I wasn't suggesting it has stopped - just following up on my previous post where I disagreed with the claim that it has. However, I also can't accept the view that extinction by mid-century is even a remote possibility. The legislative pathway is feasible, but looking very challenging the actions we see in almost every country. Although numerous countries are starting to act, it may well be too little, too late and without a strong focus on CCS, quite likely the wrong action anyway.

January 20, 2013    View Comment    

On Has Climate Change Stopped?

Willem,

Thanks for the comment. I am not so sure about the permanent feature. There is growing local pressure for the government to address air quality in China, so maybe things will change. However, just as China cleans up its act, so others mights step in to take its place (e.g. industrial Africa).

David

January 15, 2013    View Comment    

On The World Wants a Solution to Climate Change: Here It Is

Tom,

I agree that EE can reduce local emissions, such as for your house. But I don' think the global emissions picture is helped by improving EE. Rather, further growth is enabled becuase energy is made available by the EE measures, which in turn means that this energy gets consumed. EE can have real benefits for an individual or a business, but we shouldn't confuse that with the need to reduce emissions globally. In that regard, EE is not the solution.

David

December 11, 2012    View Comment    

On The World Wants a Solution to Climate Change: Here It Is

Sara,

Sorry to rain all over your parade and risk sounding like Ebenezer Scrooge at Christmas time, but energy efficiency and reducing emissions are not one in the same. In fact there is plenty of evidence to show that improvements in energy efficiency actually add to emissions on a global basis, simply because of the rebound effect (Jevons Paradox and other such anomalies). Even worse, positioning energy efficiency as a panacea for climate change risks badly misinforming policy makers on how the energy system actually works.

David

December 11, 2012    View Comment    

On Global Warming, Coal Combustion and Sea Level Rise

John,

I don't think it is the case that humans adapt well to a constantly changing environment. One of the remarkable things about the last 10,000+ years which has seen the huge expansion of humans on the planet is the extraordinarily constant state of the climate, to the extent that we have hardly had to adapt. In areas where ancient civilizations have expanded and vanished again, research has shown that it was often shifts in local climate that destabilized them.

Small perturbations on a global scale (massive volcanic eruptions) have caused all sorts of problems over the centuries (e.g. ~1816), but they quickly go away and life returns to normal. We have never had a long term global change to deal with (excluding the end of the last Ice Age as that marked the start of a stable period which saw civilization thrive).

David

September 1, 2012    View Comment    

On Extreme hot weather in the USA and climate change

Michael,

I agree, its a bit limited as it stands and in hindsight I should have said that in the posting. For example, the only reason I picked NYC Central Park was that the full dataset was available on the web. As you note, James Hansen did the more complete analysis of the shift in distribution in the paper that I pointed to in my post. My only point here was to show that within the day to day weather which is a chaotic process, there are underlying trends that point to certain externalities in play and that those externalities do impact events such as heat waves. In this case the externality might simply be the urban heat island and not the global impact of rising CO2 level, or both.

Thanks for the comment.

David

July 6, 2012    View Comment    

On Are Canada's oil sands to blame for rising atmospheric CO2?

Yes, ". . . with a potential total resource of some 1.7 trillion . . . " would have been better. Thanks.

May 23, 2012    View Comment    

On Making Sense of Misleading Talk about Cap-and-Trade in Europe and the USA

Rob,

As you mention, the problem with the EU-ETS is really one of design. An analysis by Climate Strategies indicates that the overlap of policies, primarily the Renewable Energy Directive, is the cause of the growing allowance surplus. While the recession has not helped matters, it isn't the main cause of the current situation. The low price is therefore not indicative of lowest cost abatement driving change, but the reverse. High abatement costs are being forced on EU economies through renewable energy targets and the current allowance price doesn't represent abatement opportunities at all, but is more likely a residual opportunity value for long term banking of the allowances. This isn't a healthy situation, leading to the various calls for  corrective action.

David

April 27, 2012    View Comment