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On Why Does Politics Keep Getting in the Way of Pricing Carbon? - Part 1

 

Jesse if U.S. households are willing to pay $80-200 per year to combat climate change, I suspect they would more eager to invest that amount in technologies that accomplish the desired end, yet offer the chance of a return on investment.  
July 21, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

Many thanks for the suggestion and vote of confidence Roy. I will certainly have a look at the opportunity. As to the suggestions about electrolysis I will let either Greg or Roger respond as they have far more expertise on that front than do I.

July 13, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

EP this dumping caused a huge backlash around here a year ago. In the same vain however this YouTube is essentially a synopsis of a presentation I made to the University of British Columbia Fisheries Department a year ago. A lot of people think the real problem with phytoplankton is thermal stratification.

 

July 11, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

According to a 2010 Scientific American article, What Is the Right Price for Carbon? $21/ton is too low but I take your point. There are a lot of wins for one technology and hopefully somewhere along the line the money guys will get it.

 
July 11, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

Count me in.

July 11, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

Roger, as I understand it the pH of sea water ranges between 7.5 and 8.4. The higher figure would be in the range where sodium bicarbonate would form according to the graphic. I am open however to the best way to accomplish the desired end. It seems to me the opportunity is presenting itself to solve the climate/energy problem.

July 10, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

Germany produced 35 million tons of chlorine by the chlorakali process in 1987, so there is a market but I agree it would be preferable to neutralize the analyte solution. The bottom line is that it can be done and OTEC is the opportune energy source for doing it.

July 10, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

Thanks for the clarification on both counts Roger. One of the problems with a deep water condenser system is the bouyancy of the large structures below the surface. Contiuous additions of leaching crushed rock might serve both purposes or the injection would work. I believe the economics of OTEC work with or without this adjunct but putting a price on carbon would make this approach economic as well.

July 10, 2014    View Comment    

On Carbon Sequestering Energy Production

I had a similar thought when I first read the Lawrence Livermore article. This didn't however appear to be the outcome of their lab scale demonstration.  The Arrhenius definition of an acid is a substance that, when added to water, increases the concentration of H+ ions. It seems to me that almost by definition the removal of H+ ions from water produces a base. Also ocean acidity appears to be a matter of where it occurs. The Climateprogress piece Ocean Acidification, Wildfires Are Taking Their Toll On The Pacific Northwest points out that acidification only became a problem when CO2 levels of 900 to 1,000 parts per million - almost triple normal levels - were upwelled into theeuphotic zone. With OTEC and a deep water condenser you could vent most of the chlorine at a depths of about 1000 meters. These waters would be very slow to mix back to the surface. You would still convert the CO2 but negate the acidity problem. Another alternative is you can produce other products with some of the chlorine. Some of its uses are outline here but it is probably not something you want to see at the surface.

July 10, 2014    View Comment    

On Buying the Time Necessary to Save the Planet

David OTEC operates 24/7 and would continuously drive surface heat to the deeper water.  Some of this will no doubt return, particularly in El Nino years.

June 21, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Paris, Part 1: Humans are Changing the Climate for the Worse

Average surface temperatures represent less than 2.5 percent of global warming. 


Unless you are prepared to deal with the bulk of the heat you aren't addressing the issue.

As to squid they are dependant on fish who in turn are dependent on phytoplankton, neither of which are doing well as a result of the warming of the ocean. For one thing, the heat means less oxygen in the water.  For another thermal straticifcation cuts the phytoplankton off from the nutrients they need to thrive. Utlimately this will all impact on the squid.

June 11, 2014    View Comment    

On Beyond Paris, Part 1: Humans are Changing the Climate for the Worse

Because of the mass of the oceans, they have warmed only .09°C to a depth of 2000 meters over the period 1955-2006, or about a quarter of the pace of the atmosphere. Their average depth is 4267 meters; therefore they have over twice the capacity to absorb the heat attributed to global warming as the 2000 meters measured in the 1955-2006 study by Levitus.

The Fifth Assessment report of the IPCC was confronted with the fact the atmospheric temperature trend of the past sixteen years has ground to a halt. Climate skeptics seized on this leveling of the temperature as evidence that global warming too has ground to a halt.

Levitus however shows that the heat that hasn’t been measured in the atmosphere – which accounts only for about 2.5 percent of the total global warming heat – has been found in deeper water.

Over ninety percent of warming heat has gone into the oceans; 85% above 750 meters and the rest deeper. This stratification presents the conditions essential to producing work with a heat engine. Ocean thermal energy conversion or OTEC uses such a heat engine and would mitigate many of the problems presented by global warming, by converting heat that causes thermal expansion to work, diminishing the power of storms that move heat to the poles, moving heat to regions of diminished coefficient of expansion, and converting ocean volumes to the energy currency and gas hydrogen that is necessary to move offshore generated power to market.

A recent study published in Science points out that the storage capacity of the oceans is far greater than previously expected. Yair Rosenthal, a climate scientist at Rutgers University and the lead author of the study, says:

"We may have underestimated the efficiency of the oceans as a storehouse for heat and energy. It may buy us some time – how much time, I don’t really know. But it’s not going to stop climate change."

Converting ocean heat to the power the world needs however not only buys us time it will stop climate change.

This is one human endeavor that would change the climate for the better.

June 4, 2014    View Comment