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On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

It's not black and white. The UK could do far better. It's houses, for example, are terribly inefficient.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

I might as well ask how come the fossil fuel industry, if it is so successful, has to rely on such a staggering amount of public subsidy, $1.9 trillion (according to the IMF), far more than renewable energy? [see http://www.imf.org/external/np/sec/pr/2013/pr1393.htm] If it is such a wonderful thing rely on fossil fuels, how come they need this subsidy? I think that claiming that renewable energy is a pipe dream when it clearly works, while proclaiming the virtues of fossil fuels, counts as misrepresentation.

In a presentation, David Lipton, the IMF's First Deputy Managing Director, has said that: "We do not cover subsidies for renewable energy because they involve a small share of energy use". He is not calling for their abolition.

The reason why it is interesting that these countries rely on renewable energy is that it says a number of things: firstly that it is political will rather than technology which determines the precise fuel mix of a nation, and secondly that a national grid can be adapted to work with many types of fuel input.

I note also that Statoil has been forced to abandon attempts to explore in the Arctic Circle, and that the UK purchases some of its renewable energy from Norway.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

If you know me, you should know that I promote energy-efficiency and demand management above all else.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

 So as France retires its nuclear fleet it is going to have to find more efficient non-electrical ways to provide heating for its population.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

 The UK has plenty of good luck being well endowed with the lion's share of European wind and marine energy resources. Since the 1970s, it is political will that has directed the choices for investment in energy R&D. This is why the UK lags behind other, less well endowed, European countries in exploiting renewable energy.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On EU: 100 Percent Renewable Energy Is Here

 China is not a democracy. Neither, allegedly, is the United States.

June 13, 2013    View Comment    

On To Beat Climate Change, Must Obama Win?

I agree with the WRI's view, just issued: “In its first term, the Obama administration made real progress to reduce harmful emissions and shift the country toward cleaner energy. The administration implemented historic clean vehicle rules, proposed standards for greenhouse gas emissions for new power plants, and directed unprecedented investments in clean energy, among other achievements.

“But, these actions aren’t enough. The reality is that the Obama Administration has not yet put the country on a pathway to truly confront the climate crisis. First off, the United States needs a strong national climate and energy strategy. The president should begin by re-engaging a dialogue on climate change and identifying the actions needed to address the crisis. The president should work with Congress on national-level policies, including putting a price on carbon, to get the country on a low-carbon trajectory. In addition, the EPA, in particular, has the ability to implement new standards to reduce dangerous greenhouse gases from existing power plants. The president should reject proposals that would over-exploit America’s resources, decimate its lands, or increase its dependence on high-carbon fuels.

“Many leading businesses are looking for greater clarity to stay competitive in the global economy and take advantage of the emerging $2.3 trillion clean energy market. They need to set long-term goals, which are currently being undercut by America’s piecemeal approach on climate and energy.

“In the international arena, the Administration should take a more constructive role around the climate negotiations. President Obama has shown the power of bold leadership on big international issues—and he has the opportunity to make an ambitious international climate agreement part of his legacy."

November 7, 2012    View Comment    

On To Beat Climate Change, Must Obama Win?

 He has had plenty of opportunities and will get many more. He just has to grasp the nettle and show proper leadership.

November 7, 2012    View Comment    

On As the U.N. climate talks make little progress, are we headed for 3°C rise?

Actually, Willem, you're wrong, that's not where it was originally published. We've been here before. And, so what?


I fail to understand your comment. CO2 increased very little from 1960 to 2010. Then you say CO2 increased by 23%.

 

 

September 10, 2012    View Comment    

On As the U.N. climate talks make little progress, are we headed for 3°C rise?

You want evidence? Start here: http://www.skepticalscience.com/empirical-evidence-for-global-warming.htm

September 9, 2012    View Comment    

On Wind Energy CO2 Emissions Reductions are Overstated

What you don't take into account the cost of not doing all these things. Not just now, but for the sake of the future.

July 25, 2012    View Comment    

On Wind Energy CO2 Emissions Reductions are Overstated

Here is an example of a point which you do not address: the definition raised of what counts as peer reviewed. You don't seem to understand what this means!

It's not that what you say isn't interesting, is that if we want to find out the truth, which your contribution might help us towards, we need to develop our understanding.

Just because your post is the most popular doesn't mean you are automatically completely in the right!

Your point seems to be that emission savings are inaccurately attributed to the addition of wind turbines to the National Grid. But by my understanding emissions are calculated from actual emissions from actual fossil fuel powered power stations. Therefore, there is no false accounting.

The technology that we are introducing is evolving all the time, the 1st industrial revolution did not happen overnight. Bicycles were faster than the first cars, but that was not a reason to discontinue their development. As the smart grid is introduced, as more kinds of energy storage are developed, and as other forms of more efficient renewable energy enter the system, over the next 30 to 40 years, we will move to a situation where most of our energy comes from renewable sources. Decarbonisation of the grid is happening simultaneously on many fronts, at least here in Europe.

July 25, 2012    View Comment