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Does Europe Really Need an EPS to Keep from Falling Behind America?

Last month at the European Parliament, the WWF held an event that was titled: “Fighting Coal CO2 Pollution: Is the EU Falling behind the US?” The event was held to discuss the United States’ use of an Emission Performance Standard (EPS) as a...

Posted December 9, 2014    

Did the "People's Climate" March Leave Conservatives on the Sidelines?

The article is also part of a TheEnergyCollective.com series on climate change and conservatives. See also "Should the Climate Movement Turn Down the Radicalism?" by Neil Stenhouse and "People's Climate March and Conservatives: Should Naomi...

Posted October 6, 2014    

People's Climate March: Why We March

We left at six in the morning from Washington, D.C., bleary-eyed and unresponsive to the bus leader who gave us the run down on how the day would go. But by ten o’clock, when the bus rolled into New York City, people were introducing themselves,...

Posted September 27, 2014    

The Price is Not (Yet) Right in Climate Policy on Both Sides of the Atlantic

Earlier today at the Center for Global Development, IMF Director Christine Legarde gave a talk promoting 'responsible' energy pricing, defined as pricing reflects the environmental costs of fossil fuels, by way of launching the IMF's new publication...

Posted August 4, 2014    

Model Governance and Emissions Models, Transparency and Climate Policy in China and the EU

Last week Reuters published a brief article updating the public on the status of Beijing’s emissions trading system, with its thinly traded volumes and largely opaque transactions. The crux of the article comes in the last...

Posted July 1, 2014    

Divestment and Arctic Development, Between Drilling and the Deep Blue Sea

“Unlike most of the planet, the Arctic still contains uncharted mysteries,” a recent Bloomberg article quoted Scott Minerd of Guggenheim Partners LLC as saying.The statement is no doubt true. The Arctic is among the last pristine wildernesses on the...

Posted May 5, 2014    

Why Richard Tol is Wrong about the IPCC

“It’s pretty damn obvious there are positive impacts of climate change,” Reuters reports Professor Richard Tol saying on his way to disassociating himself from the Fifth Assessment Report for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change...

Posted April 2, 2014    

Quantifying the Impact of Multiple Avenues of Methane's Underestimation

Cornell professors Robert Howarth, Renee Santoro, and Anthony Ingraffea ignited a controversy in 2011 when they published a study claiming that, due to escaped methane, emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas were worse than coal. Their...

Posted January 23, 2014    

Politics and the Language of REDD+

“For the moment you start to discussion some enteral principle or another, you are not arguing, you are fighting. That eternal principle censors out all the objections, isolates the issue from its background and its context, and sets going in you...

Posted November 5, 2013    

Can the World Banks' Green Bonds Become a Scalable Climate Solution?

Earlier this month, the World Bank announced the launch of US$ 550 million dollars of Green Bonds—its largest U.S. issuance to date. Are Green Bonds a way forward for climate finance, or will the World Bank’s Green Bond issuances remain a...

Posted September 2, 2013    

Population Growth: Malthus Rolls Over

Last week, Oxford Computer Science Professor Steven Emmott published an excerpt of his book, Ten Billion, in The Guardian. The tone of the excerpt breaks all of the rules about communication on environmental issues. It uniformly grim and offers no...

Posted July 7, 2013    

Media Coverage of Pollution in China and the U.S.

But I hear someone exclaiming that the concealment of wickedness is often difficult; to which I answer, nothing great is easy. Nevertheless, the argument indicates this—if we would be happy—to be the path along which we should proceed. With a view...

Posted June 8, 2013