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On The Smart Grid Can Change the Energy Agenda

  

I’m glad we agree that it is important to reduce the use of oil.  We can't pretend that a shift to electrified transportation is easy, but we shouldn't shortchange ourselves either. Humans are the most adaptable and innovative animals ever put on this earth, and it is time to flex a little.  We have the creativity and drive for incredible accomplishments.  The USA launched its first unmanned spacecraft on July 29, 1960.  Nine years later on July 20, 1969, we put the first humans on the moon.  Nine years.

We need to think big again, and we need to challenge our brightest minds to innovate.  I see that happening out here in Silicon Valley and many other parts of the world, and that's good.  More than that, we need to challenge the thinking (or the electability) of the politicians in Washington who continue to protect oil industry subsidies.  That annual $2 billion dollars would be better spent on upgrading the electrical grid and transforming transportation.

March 29, 2012    View Comment    

On The Smart Grid Can Change the Energy Agenda

There are a number of EV projections available today.   Given the volatility of gas prices, take your pick of the one that is going to be closest to reality.  There are two points in my blog: 1) policy can and should influence the infrastructure transformation to a Smart Grid, and 2) eliminating oil as the primary transport fuel delivers the best energy and economic security to the USA.    

Focusing on the Keystone pipeline misses these points.  However, if the oil is meant for US consumption, then why not build pipelines to inland refineries?  According to the US Energy Information Administration (http://www.eia.gov/neic/rankings/refineries.htm), we have them in Montana, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Wyoming.  Why transport further away to a port unless the intention is that it is much more easily available to the highest bidder anywhere in the world? 

Debating about sources and destinations of oil (crude or refined) is as useful as rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic.  Our earth’s CO2 hangover is going to last much longer than the fossil fuel party, but it shouldn’t be misconstrued as an opportunity to continue binging.    Domestic renewables and electrification of transportation deliver economic and energy security and will not be at the mercy of global market prices to whipsaw our economy.  The Smart Grid enables the integration of domestic renewables and EVs and ends our need for oil.  It’s a win for everyone.

March 25, 2012    View Comment