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On Carbon Pricing: Accounting Isn't Enough

Bob, You are probably right - it's what we need but the stars aren't aligned to deliver it. However, the proposal that IETA outline is not a top down Euro (Kyoto) type implementation, but something more akin to the way the rest of the international monetary system works - i.e. a virtual international currency (US$) with linkages by exchange rate. David
April 20, 2015    View Comment    

On Climate and Global Energy: The Answer Lies After 2050, Probably Not Before

Bob,

Clearly that is where we are heading, but building that much CCS by 2020 isn't feasible. However, to get there, I personally think we need to start with such a concept. I discussed the same idea in a recent post.

http://blogs.shell.com/climatechange/2014/11/twoviews/

Regards

David

January 15, 2015    View Comment    

On Climate and Global Energy: The Answer Lies After 2050, Probably Not Before

In fairness, you should quote sentences in their entirety, rather than just picking out one bit to change the meaning. There are two pretty major caveats there which you ignored.

With such CCS infrastructure in place and given the size of the remaining ultimately recoverable resources (which the Letter puts at ~4,000 Gt for coal alone), fossil fuel use could continue into the 22ndCentury hardly impacting the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, assuming it remains competitive with the alternatives available at that time.

January 15, 2015    View Comment    

On Climate and Global Energy: The Answer Lies After 2050, Probably Not Before

Bob,

I am sorry you think that of me Bob, it wasn't the intention of the article. I fully agree that continued release of geological carbon into the atmosphere is a big issue and clearly not a sustainable proposition. Equally, we depend totally on doing so for everything that goes on in the world today. There are only two solutions to this problem; stop using fossil fuels for energy production or capture and return the carbon to the geosphere after the energy it delivers is used. Clearly both of these pathways need to be explored - the fact that Shell happens to focus on one of these shouldn't in itself be a reason for criticism. Certainly there are plenty of other entities focusing on the other route forward.

David

January 15, 2015    View Comment    

On Carbon Pricing in 2014

Bob, I found this useful summary (below) on the C2ES website. It is clearly not as simple as the BC approach, but it is largely recycled to households and industry. Over 50 percent of revenue generated from the carbon price is returned to households, particularly low-income ones, through tax relief and greater family benefit payments; Revenue generated by the program, along with additional government resources, will be used to ease the impact on trade-exposed industries and workers, and boost investments in renewable power, energy efficiency and other low-carbon alternatives; Implementation of the plan is expected to cost the government AUD 4.3 billion over the first four years, over and above revenue generated. David
January 8, 2015    View Comment    

On Carbon Pricing in 2014

My understanding of the Australian system (which is now gone) is that during the tax phase the money collected by the government was distribued back into the economy through a series of tax and levy reductions. It wasn't as clean as the BC approach, but it was essentially the same thing.
January 8, 2015    View Comment    

On Carbon Pricing in 2014

Bob, I agree that BC have done a great job and it seems to be sticking, but that's one part of one country. Contrast that with the political storm in Australia over the same thing and "difficult to implement" becomes an understatement. Unfortunately I see more jurisdictions at the Australia end of the spectrum than at the BC end of the spectrum. I certainly didn't mean to take away from the work that BC has done. David
January 8, 2015    View Comment    

On Yes, Virginia, There is CCS

Bob,

i agree that much of the CCS activity to date has involved EOR, but that is not always the case. Three projects in the pipeline that Shell is involved in do not involve EOR; Gorgon in Australia, Quest in Canada and Peterhead in Scotland  are all storage projects.

David

December 26, 2014    View Comment    

On Two Views on Mitigation Economics

Bob,

Perhaps you have misinterpreted what I mean here. If infrastructure already exists (e.g. oil platform) to extract from a known field or mine, the marginal cost of operation is possibly quite low, hence it is likely that this facility will continue to run even if prices fall as alternatives come into the market. Capital debt may not get serviced at such low prices, in which case the original operator may cease to trade, but a new operator may well come in and continue the extraction. New projects may not proceed, but there is already so much infrastructure in place that exisiting reserve extraction may just continue until fields and mines are depleted. This outlook can change with the use of a mechanism such as a carbon price.

David

November 18, 2014    View Comment    

On Fueling the Industrial Heartland

Edward,

This doesn't actually solve the CO2 issue though - it simply recycles CO2 that is already destined for the atmosphere.

David

April 2, 2014    View Comment    

On Fueling the Industrial Heartland

Edward,

This doesn't really make sense from an energy balance perspective. CO2 is the result of fuel combustion, so given the inefficiencies of manufacture you would have to put more energy into the process than you would get out when the fuel is used. Unfortunately you are fighting thermodynamics on this one.

David

April 1, 2014    View Comment    

On Living in a Renewables Distortion Field

Jens,

I didn't say nor do I think that business as usual will continue for decades. What I said is that even with some heroic assumptions about solar deployment it will still take a very long time for large scale displacement of fossil fuels. The assumptions in the Oceans scenario about solar rollout far outsrip even the most optimistic forecasts around today, yet it takes the rest of this century for the change to fully take place.

David

March 27, 2014    View Comment